Ruins of Muscavado Sugar Mill in Tigbauan, Iloilo

Ruins of Muscavado Sugar Mill in Tigbauan, Iloilo

Muscavado sugar mill ruins on Zayco Farm in Barangay Namocon, Tigbauan, Iloilo.  It located on a Barangay highway which leaves the Countrywide Highway opposite the Sol y Mar Vacation resort entrance  and will come out at the Tigbauan-Leon highway near the Tigbauan Countrywide Higher School.  The Zayco farm is just one of the biggest in the place, despite the fact that its size was minimized throughout land redistribution in the course of the Marcos era.  Some of these pics had been furnished by the Zayco family members.

Old_Zayco_House-2

Zayco farm property which was found throughout what is now a barangay highway from the sugar mill.  We ended up instructed that ahead of WW II, that the farm employed a Japanese employee who turned out to be a spy or informer for the Japanese invasion forces.  We were informed that since this man or woman had been well taken care of whilst used on the farm, that he gave a warning to the loved ones concerning the impending Japanese invasion and explained to them to flee.  The family members took a number of possessions and retreated to the mountains further than Leon.  During the war this farm residence was applied as a headquarters by the Japanese. The moment the war was more than, the farm home was burned by nearby people who could not of wished the loved ones to return and reassert command over the farm lands.  This image is said to have been taken in 1914.

Old_Zayco_Sugar_mill_construction-2

This image is reported to be of the building of the Zayco sugar mill.  Almost all the land in the location now grows rice or are used for pasture, formerly sugar cane was the main crop.

Old_Zayco_railroad-2

This photograph is explained to be of a sugar mill rail line, formerly on the Zayco Farm.  It would have transported cane from the encompassing fields to the mill for processing.

Hand powered sugar railroad (not Zayco Farm)

Hand powered sugar railroad (not Zayco Farm)

Old_Zayco_workers-2

Sugar mill workers and bodega(?)

Old_Zayco_Sugar_mill_inside-2

Staff crowded all-around sugar mill machinery. Zayco photograph.

Old_Zayco_Watson_Glascow-2Photograph from Zayco household labelled “centrifuga”.  There is a manufacturer’s plaque on the equipment in the picture. With a magnifying glass we have been equipped to make out the words and phrases “Watson” and “Glasgow”.   It appears to be to be truthful to believe that this is a sugar centrifuge used to separate the sugar crystals from the molasses from cane.  Compare this equipment from the illustration underneath.

watson_mill_1-2

This is an advertisement from “machinery and devices of the sugar cane factory” dated 1937.

We have also been told that the mill chimney was ruined by the January 25, 1948 “Lady Caycay” earthquake, the next biggest earthquake in Philippine recorded heritage.

 

Sugar mill ruins in Tigbauan, Iloilo

Sugar mill ruins in Tigbauan, Iloilo

Nowadays the agricultural land encompassing the mill ruins are generally rice land, but previously were planted with sugar cane.  The mill ruins are established in a very quite grove of massive Acacia trees.If any individual has data on the mill and its record make sure you share it in the remark box down below.

Sugar mill foundations and setting

Sugar mill foundations and environment

Sugar mill foundations

Sugar mill foundations

The sugar mill ruins are set on this road bordered by huge old Acacia trees.

The sugar mill ruins are established on this road bordered by substantial previous Acacia trees.

Old Iloilo sugar mill - location unknown

Old Iloilo sugar mill – site not known

Sugar mill machinery, unknown location in Iloilo

Sugar mill machinery, unfamiliar location in Iloilo

Advanced Muscovado Mill System. G. E. Nesom and Herbert Walker Handbook on the Sugar Industry of the Philippine Islands (Manila: Bureau of Printing, 1912), pt. 2, p. 100.

Sophisticated Muscovado Mill Program. G. E. Nesom and Herbert Walker
Handbook on the Sugar Field of the Philippine Islands (Manila: Bureau of
Printing, 1912), pt. 2, p. 100.